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Case law: Transport companies’ health and safety procedures should take power lines into account

Employers with a fleet that includes high vehicles should ensure their health and safety procedures and training take into account the potential risk to those vehicles and their drivers from overhead power lines.

February 2019

This update was published in Legal Alert - February 2019

Legal Alert is a monthly checklist from Atom Content Marketing highlighting new and pending laws, regulations, codes of practice and rulings that could have an impact on your business.

A lorry driver pulled into a layby to clean his lorry between loads as required as part of his job. However, 11kV electricity power lines ran along the layby at a height of 7.3 metres. The lorry connected with the power lines and the driver suffered severe 25% burns and life-changing injuries requiring amputations and other major surgery.

He claimed that the employer’s health and safety risk assessment procedures were inadequate. The court agreed that the employer’s procedures were inadequate and that the employee was entitled to damages.

Operative date

  • Now

Recommendation

  • Employers with a fleet that includes high vehicles should ensure their health and safety procedures and training take into account the potential risk to vehicles and their drivers from overhead power lines.

Disclaimer: This article from Atom Content Marketing is for general guidance only, for businesses in the United Kingdom governed by the laws of England. Atom Content Marketing, expert contributors and ICAEW (as distributor) disclaim all liability for any errors or omissions.

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