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Inventory planning and Brexit

Brexit provides an opportunity for businesses to consider the information they hold on their supply chains/inventory as well as their approach to continuity planning. Read our guide to assist you in balancing the costs of these exercises with the potential benefits.

What the guide covers

Why could Brexit impact inventory?

Inventory planning and Brexit

The full guide will also cover the potential impact on the UK/EU after Brexit, and what you can do now to ensure your business can deal with potential supply-chain disruption.

Download the complete guide

Brexit provides an opportunity for businesses to consider the information they hold on their supply chains/inventory as well as their approach to continuity planning. This updated guide aims to assist you in balancing the costs of these exercises with the potential benefits. The guidance shown below must be weighed up alongside existing COVID-19 concerns. As negotiations and developments continue apace, members should refer back to the Brexit Hub for updated guidance.

Page last updated

9 October 2020

Why should I consider inventory planning?

There are many potential causes of supply chain disruption. In some sectors, such as harvested plants, disruption can be endemic, elsewhere spikes in customer demand may be more of an issue than interruption to supply, equally some sectors may never have experienced material disruption. Clearly, the effort spent on contingency planning should reflect the risk to the business of disruption; risk is a combination of likelihood and impact. But where there are material risks, the benefits of robust contingency planning are clear. Brexit provides an opportunity to reconsider continuity planning and may offer a rare window of organisational attention to get it done.